Saturday, April 16, 2011

"Emerging Viruses and Vaccinations: Len Horowitz" DVD

The DVD “Emerging Viruses and Vaccinations: Len Horowitz” (NSI/"New Science Ideas", 2004) has author Leonard G. Horowitz explaining his book “Emerging Viruses: AIDS and Ebola: Nature, Accident or Intentional?”, Amazon link here.  The DVD actually has two lectures (the first is split, with the last part about vaccines at the end of the film; some of the lecture material dates to 1997).

Horowitz maintains that the viruses were developed in the 1970s and tested intentionally by introducing them into vaccines, especially Hepatitis B.  He says that the first AIDS cases occurred in New York City in 1978 (which comports with an unusual incident that happened when I was living there the spring of that year).  He provides an almost witty discussion of the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which he sees as a perversion of the way life is built from DNA and then RNA.  He mentions the now little known HTLV-I leukemia virus (HIV was originally called HTLV-III).

He opens his first lecture with some discussion of Florida dentist David J. Acer (died 1990), who was claimed to have transmitted HIV to five of his patients. Horowitz claims that this was intentional, in order to implicate the government.

The second lecture gets into dicey territory, as he claims a link between eugenics and the Genome Project, and makes many other supposed links between vaccines and neo-Nazi agenda. He also talks about the "Rockefeller complex." 

He mentions a connection between pharmaceutical companies and Uganda, quite chilling given recent events.

Howowitz also has a film “In Lies we Trust” on YouTube (not on Netflix as far as I can tell), which I will look in to.

He says that he is a Jew converted "simultaneously" to Christianity (so was composer Gustav Mahler).

I took the Hepatitis B vaccine in 1982 (three shots then) and never became HIV+.

There was no mention of the "controversy" over vaccines and autism. 


Note: Robert Preston's "The Hot Zone" is reviewed on the Books Blog Dec. 11, 2009.

No comments: