Friday, October 05, 2012

Videos show that Canary Islands eruption and underwater avalanche could wipe out US East Coast


I looked up in YouTube the category “tsunami cumber vieja” and found a number of videos.
     
One of the most informative originates with the BBC, “Mega Tsunami – Canary Islands Threat”, posted by “jennylunatic” Oct. 2011 (9 min), with YouTube link here.

The general risk is that a volcanic eruption on this volcano in the Canary Islands would cause a landslide that could generate a tsunami several hundred feet high toward the East Coast of the United States, where 40 million people live (below 500 feet elevation).  There would be eight hours notice.  

The Canary Islands are an autonomous region of Spain geographically located off the northwest coast of Africa, about at the latitude of South Carolina. 

Apparently, there are volcanic eruptions in the area about once every 100-200 years and the largest ones cause catastrophic landslides, the last of which appears to have occurred 120,000 years ago.

This video also mentioned a tsunami over 1000 feet high in an Alaskan inlet.

There’s a video  (“Global Alert: Mega Tsunami from the Canary Islands”) based on the History Channel and posted by the “Nordic Truth” that claims that such an event is imminent.  The video has good graphics. Bill Daegle and John Moore narrate, and claim that dangerous eruptions happen every 300 years.  This video says that significant tsunami  (30-40 feet, mainly in Florida) could be generated by an earthquake alone in the Canaries, even without an underwater landslide.  The video gives the detailed geography of the volcanoes.  This video says that the tsunami  from a landslide could be 3000 feet high, breaching the Appalachians, but It might decrease to a hundred feet or so crossing the ocean.  The link is here. 

Simon Day gives a discussion from the Discovery Spotlight (“Amercia’s East Coast Meega Tsunami Canary Islands Explained”, posted by High Powered Lasers. 

John Goff explains that there is an underwater ridge somewhere off the coast of North Carolina that could slip and generate a significant tsunami.


This topic would make a good subject for a longer documentary film. So far the existing videos don't have very imaginative titles. 

Can anything at all be done about it?

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