Sunday, February 12, 2017

"End Day": a scientist creating a strangelet is taken through three other ways to end the world first


The BBC TV film “End Day” (2005, written and directed by Gareth Edwards), in 48 minutes, covers four ways civilization could come to an end.

A scientist (Bill McGuire) gets up in his London condo and heads for the airport to New York.  Once he gets there, he will turn a key on a particle accelerator (it’s actually in Switzerland) that, it turns out, creates a strangelet that consumes the Earth and converts it to grey goo. The film does mention the idea of a microscopic black hole, which would evaporate (as Hawking radiation).

But the first three acts reenact three other possibilities:  They’re all handled in pretty cornball fashion. In each case, the scientist tries to fly to NYC.

One is that the Cumbre Vieja volcano in the Canary Islands splits in half, with an underwater landslide that sends a 500-foot tsunami toward the East Coast.  That’s high enough to topple the skyscrapers in New York, and it would go much farther than three miles inland.

A second scenario is that a huge asteroid hits Berlin, preceded by meteor storms.  Attempts to blow it up with nuclear weapons fail (even with Trump as president).  The disasters are narrated dispassionately by a BBC news anchor who shows no emotion.



The other idea is that a 1918-style bird flu suddenly spreads by air travel from the far East.

The film is available on Instant Play with Netflix subscription.

Wikipedia attribution link for Aceh 2004 Indonesia tsunami VCSA 2.0 unde CCSA 2.0 byr Aus AID.  

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