Saturday, August 25, 2018

"Charlottesville Car Attack: Full Livestream" from Ford Fischer at News2Share



Ford Fischer and News2Share have a 57-minute video from Aug. 12, 2017 “Charlottesville Car Attack: Full Livestream”.  The factual details on Wikipedia, including the fatality Heather Heyer, are here


Fischer is walking in the neighborhood and notes that the counterprotesters are shadowing the neo-Nazis also as on a chess board. At about 8 minutes he near the intersection of the incident, which has suddenly happened about a block and a half from him, downhill and to his left. The video does not show the impacts.  These were multiple, as many of the casualties happened when the Dodge rear-ended another vehicle causing a chain reaction which struck people.

In the ensuing forty minutes Fischer, who has a helmet, notes the mounting casualties and the inability of paramedics to revive at least one victim, Heyer.  Soon multiple ambulances arrive.  Two or three casualties are shown on stretchers. Fischer often advises viewer discretion, but minimizes showing injuries.

There is another video channel on YouTube by “SonofNewo” that offers multiple YouTube videos analyzing Fischer’s work and seems to present the belief that the there is some controversy.  These video mastheads speak of Charlottesville "Zapruder" and "Grassy Knoll" footage.  YouTube will offers these to watch alongside Fischer’s. One of them has a claim that Fischer walked past two of the other vehicles 5-7 minutes before the incident.  I have not watched these yet and cannot yet comment on their relevance (obviously coincidence is possible), but I’ll watch them soon.
  
There is a general question about “see something, say something” if you are at an event and filming, and see that a crime is about to take place or just has. There is also a moral question about physical intervention when this is possible.  Since 2015 I have witnessed three auto accidents (my car was struck when stopped at a light in the 2015 incident by a secondary impact). On all three occasions I have called 9-1-1 and been quizzed on the line as to whether I could do anything for casualties (stop bleeding, etc) before police arrived. In no case could I have.  But the idea of responsibility is there.  A few days a go, a car went into reverse dragging a woman with it.  I had just left the store and it happened behind me as a homeless person saw it.  Had I seen it should I have tried to assist the woman physically stopping it?  Where are the demands for courage? 
A recent incident where a security guard was fired when she didn't come to the aid of an officer but continued filming provides some fodder for this issue. 

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