Sunday, July 21, 2019

"I Received the Most Ridiculous Community Guidelines Strike": a pliability of the meaning of "hate speech"


“Computing Forever” describes a YouTube community guidelines strike he got for “hate speech” (“I Received the Most Ridiculous Community Guidelines Strike”).


The offending December 2018 video is mirrored in Bitchute and is called “British Film Institute Succumbs to Political Correctness”, here.   The video reports that the BFI is backing an “I am not your villain” campaign by not funding films will villains having facial deformities.
  
Jordan Peterson had gone into this area recently with a video where he talked about Captain Hook in Peter Pan.

The campaign in Britain had apparently been directed at a perception that people with visible deformities are more likely to behave as villains.  I have never heard of the impulse before that such an idea is taken seriously.  (Although back in the 1950s, my own father would make comments about people he saw on emerging television and then in public that expressed that sentiment with respect to obesity, for example.) 

But logically the “offending” video simply criticizes a policy that tries to discourage funding a film that might goad some viewers into believing such a notion.  The speech in the video, taken at face value and read logically, does not literally mean that such persons are purported to be “evil”.

But, as with reporting legitimate livestreamed news content, YouTube has recently had trouble with content that is “embedded” inside other content that provides a larger context, the concept that foreign languages express with a “subjunctive mood” (as formally conjugated verbs) which English cannot do as well without context.

There are associated issues today with casting, where the lack of casting of minorities in a film might be interpreted as hostility by some;  on the other hand, casting a cis person in a trans role (which is less common to start with) is seen as wrong by some.

He makes a comment about Section 230 of the CDA and claims that YouTube is behaving like a "publisher" rather than a utility. 

Would "The Joker" be an acceptable character in BFI's code?  (Unfortunately that's who James Holmes thought he was in 2012.)
      
The voice in the Bitchute value sounds like that of Black Pigeon.
   
YouTube is supposed to be warning creators the first time before issuing strikes, but this does not seem to be happening.

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